The 3 Tips That Will Help You Burn More Fat during Your Workout

They’re so extremely simple that you’ll wish you had known about them years ago

Kettlebell image

It’s time for an important gut check. It’s easy, I promise. Just wrap a tape measure around your waist, halfway between your ribs and hips. Look at the number. Is it less than half your height in inches?


It should be.

Keeping your height-to-waist ratio to at least 2:1 can increase your life expectancy by lowering your risk for inflammation issues, diabetes, heartdisease, or stroke. You’re also 50 percent less likely to suffer erectile dysfunction.

Related: The Anarchy Workout—One Guy Lost 18 Pounds of Fat in Just 6 Weeks!

If you don’t hit the 2:1 ratio, let’s get you there. You need to incorporate a ton of inefficient exercises into your routine—ones that challenge both the mind and muscles—so that you can burn as much fat as possible and rev your metabolism for hours afterward. My favorite way to do this: combine total-body strength movements, short bouts of cardio, and loaded carries together in a circuit. I call these categories the “big three” when it comes to melting your middle at the gym.

Total-Body Movements
To burn a ton of calories, choose big exercises that skyrocket your heart beat and leave you panting for breath. My picks: kettlebell swings, goblet squats, burpees, and any move that makes you quickly move up and down, and back and forth.

I recommend tracking your heart rate during these exercises. It’s a great way to get instant feedback, and to figure out when you should push harder and faster, and when you should slow down.

First, crunch the following two numbers:

1. Maximum heart rate: 180 minus your age
2. Minimum heart rate: 160 minus your age

Then strap on a heart rate monitor and perform an exercise until you reach your max heart rate number. Stop. When your heart rate dips below your minimum number, start again.

Short Cardio
I normally wouldn’t suggest jumping on a standard cardiovascular machine—like the indoor rower, elliptical, stationary bicycle, or treadmill—but they can work wonders for fat loss if you use them right. The key: Don’t spend a lot of time on them.

I’ve found that two 2-minute rounds of work has a positive impact on heart rate, body temperature, and breathing without greatly hindering your strength or power later in the workout. But you must go all-out for each 2-minute round. No slacking. Try to create a swimming pool of sweat beneath the machine in the short time span.

Related: How Much Fat is Covering Your Abs? (You May Be Shocked!)

Loaded Carry Finisher
Cap of your fat-burning session with a farmer’s walk. Sure, you could kill yourself with something like car pushes, but a loaded carry is a repeatable, moderate finisher that forces every muscle to work in unison for a long time. The result: more calories burned. You’ll want to do this for 10 to 15 minutes at the end of your session.

At my gym, we use something called the Cook Drill, which comes from Gray Cook, P.T., founder of the Functional Movement System.

Here’s how it works: Standing, hold a kettlebell in the bottoms-up rack position at your shoulder. (The handle should point toward the floor and the bell should point toward the ceiling.) A good weight to shoot for: 20 kilograms.

Now press the bell straight overhead and walk. You should feel like a European waiter in a cafe. Your arm should be completely straight, and your shoulder “packed” (pull it down, away from your ear).

If you feel your arm start to wobble or your core start the shift, you’ve lost integrity. When that happens, bring the weight back to the bottoms-up rack position. Hold this position and continue to walk until you feel yourself losing integrity again. Release the weight to your side so you’re holding it like a suitcase. Once you can’t hold the weight in that position, switch hands and start from the beginning.

You can also sub in rucking—or walking with a weighted pack on your back—in exchange for loaded carries. (See why it was named The #1 Fitness Trend You Must Try This Fall.)

The Circuit
Now put it all together. Here’s a basic template to follow. You can sub in any exercise, as long as it falls into the proper “big three” category. There’s no prescribed rest, so take a break only when you need it.

Total-Body Movement: 100 kettlebell swings
Short Cardio: 500-meter row
Total-Body Movement: 100 kettlebell swings
Short Cardio: 500-meter row
Total-Body Movement: 100 kettlebell swings
Loaded Carry Finisher: 400-meter Cook drill



Source by menshealth

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